Responsible Management Education book by PRME published

Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) recently published Responsible Management Education – a book focusing on advancing sustainable development into education, research and partnerships at higher education institutions and, specifically, at business schools, with the purpose of educating responsible leaders for today and tomorrow.

The book was contributed to by the PRME community and we had the pleasure to have members of the oikos community and oikos International team contribute to the book – Oliver Braunschweig, Giuliana Longworth and J.Christopher Proctor contributed an entire chapter.

Abstract

Written by many of the key influencers at the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), the book focuses on advancing sustainable development into education, research and partnerships at higher education institutions and, specifically, at business schools, with the purpose of educating responsible leaders for today and tomorrow.

The book serves as a concrete source of inspiration for universities and other stakeholders in higher education on structures, processes and content for how to advance responsible management education and sustainable development. It articulates the importance of key themes connected with climate change, gender equality, anti-corruption, business for peace, anti-poverty and other topics that are related to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The book emphasizes the significance of local–global interaction, drawing on local action at management schools in combination with global knowledge exchange across the PRME community. In addition, the book clearly demonstrates the background, key milestones and successful achievements of PRME as a global movement by management schools in collaboration with a broader community of higher education professionals. It exemplifies action in various local geographies in PRME Chapters, PRME Working Groups and the PRME Champions work to advance responsible management education. The authors of the book are all globally experienced deans, professors, educators, executives and students with a global outlook, who are united to advance responsible management education locally and globally.

The book will be invaluable reading for university leaders, educators, business school deans and students wanting to understand and embed responsible management education approaches across their institutions and curricula.

Read the ebook for free

The book was made open source and is open and free for everyone to read! You can find it on the Taylor&Francis website, read it online or download the entire book and selected chapters.

The oikos International chapter is also available on our website here!

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oikos International

posted January 20, 2022

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Responsible Management Education | The PRME Global Movement Chapter #29

Abstract

Written by many of the key influencers at the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), the book focuses on advancing sustainable development into education, research and partnerships at higher education institutions and, specifically, at business schools, with the purpose of educating responsible leaders for today and tomorrow.

The book serves as a concrete source of inspiration for universities and other stakeholders in higher education on structures, processes and content for how to advance responsible management education and sustainable development. It articulates the importance of key themes connected with climate change, gender equality, anti-corruption, business for peace, anti-poverty and other topics that are related to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The book emphasizes the significance of local–global interaction, drawing on local action at management schools in combination with global knowledge exchange across the PRME community. In addition, the book clearly demonstrates the background, key milestones and successful achievements of PRME as a global movement by management schools in collaboration with a broader community of higher education professionals. It exemplifies action in various local geographies in PRME Chapters, PRME Working Groups and the PRME Champions work to advance responsible management education. The authors of the book are all globally experienced deans, professors, educators, executives and students with a global outlook, who are united to advance responsible management education locally and globally.

The book will be invaluable reading for university leaders, educators, business school deans and students wanting to understand and embed responsible management education approaches across their institutions and curricula.

The chapter 29 is contributed by oikos International (Oliver Braunschweig, Giuliana Longworth and J.Christopher Proctor). Click here to read it.

The full ebook is free and available here.

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oikos International

posted January 20, 2022

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Social Responsibility in a Context of Globalization of the Markets: Comparative Study of Public Policies Articulation in the Pharmaceutical Industry of Brazil and Spain

Capitalist society faces one of its greatest challenges in the beginning of the millennium: How can sustainable social, economic and environmental development be reconciled with capitalist drivers of efficiency and generation of profits? With increasing international integration and pressure from financial markets, typical of the current neoliberal power model, it calls into question the extent to which corporations can make elections truly free in order to build a more responsible world. Furthermore, it is worth questioning whether it is possible to demand or even expect that states and governmental institutions participate and intervene more in society with increasing budgetary constraints and loss of autonomy. Based on these concerns about the role of corporations and about the validity of the concepts of corporate social responsibility and sustainability, this research aimed to evaluate CSR practices by using the pharmaceutical sector as an empirical reference and analyzing social and environmental performance indicators, the influence of the institutional framework of national systems and strategic execution case studies of two pharmaceutical corporations within the institutional frameworks of Brazil and Spain. The study demonstrated the importance of legal and regulatory frameworks by conditioning and limiting decision-making about access to medicine, which foster or undermine responsible behavior by organizations. The research concludes that the institutional framework has a paramount effect on the result of the interaction between corporations and society, through public policies intelligently conceived to promote the highest possible level of general welfare. In the case of the pharmaceutical sector, policies to adequately remunerate capital to offset the business risk of investing in research and development and, at the same time, promote the general public’s highest possible level of access to advances in biotechnology and biomedical research.

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oikos International

posted February 14, 2017

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Sustainability Knowledge Management in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: Investigating the Effects of Sustainability Management Tools

This PhD thesis examines the connections between sustainability knowledge management (SKM) and sustainability management tools in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). While previous literature has established that knowledge is essential for the application of sustainability management tools, the effects of such tools on knowledge management are under-researched in the sustainability context. Drawing on multiple academic papers and utilizing various research methods, including a systematic literature review, several quantitative surveys and a multiple case study approach, the thesis systematically examines how such tools can facilitate the identification, acquisition, conversion, application and retention of sustainability knowledge, and potentially lead to the improvement of SKM effectiveness in SMEs. Furthermore, it examines how support functions for sustainability management tools and SKM correspond with each other.
The findings reveal that sustainability management tools facilitate the SKM processes (identification, acquisition, conversion, application and retention), and align with the support factors (e.g. top management support, shared vision, employee qualifications) to advance SKM in SMEs. Particularly, such tools permit the institutionalization of sustainability knowledge into the daily routines and practices in SMEs. Additionally, tools create a support structure for SKM, embedding and preserving sustainability knowledge in documents, policies, procedures and norms for an enterprise’s collective knowledge for sustainability management. The thesis concludes with complementing areas of future research and offers practical implications for SME management.

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oikos International

posted August 22, 2016

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oikos Alumni Debates Online

Value Creation from Sustainability

The market environment is fundamentally changing in the face of immense global environmental and social challenges, and the need for sustainable business practices represents an important opportunity for businesses and organizations to seize. Integrating environmental and social values into core business activities is the crucial for lasting profit and growth. Please join us on September 27th at 7pm CEST online for a lively panel by oikos Alumni on the role of sustainability in creating long-term value and business resiliency. How can sustainability be developed and leveraged as a competitive advantage? How can environmentally and socially responsible practices make businesses more economically profitable and organizationally resilient moving into the future? We will discuss the role that consultancies play in helping organizations strategically adopt and embed sustainable practices to create long-term value and resilience.

Two panelists will lead the discussion on Sustainability Consulting for Value Creation.

  • Katharina Beck, Manager, Accenture Strategy Sustainability Services
  • Thomas Petruschke,  Managing Director, BSD Consulting

Greg Ives will moderate the panel.

More info here.

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oikos International

posted August 9, 2016

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Conceptual analysis of the international logistics of Daimler Trucks under the assumption of a 2° target policy

At the example of Daimler Trucks, this thesis aims at raising awareness for highly possible changes in the business environment of every major company that uses sophisticated logistic networks in order to enhance competitive advantage. Excessive emissions of GHGs, especially CO2 trigger these developments and are at the center of the thesis at hand.

Part one will comprise the whole theoretical background by first introducing strong arguments of avoiding a temperature rise above 2°C. Afterwards, the importance of identifying GHG externalities as an economic parameter is emphasized and thus, government regulation of emissions is justified. Thereafter, the thesis will focus on the freight transport sector, which will be hit especially hard by respective government regulation. Freight demand and corresponding emissions under a BAU scenario will be contrasted with those of under the IEA’s 450ppm scenario. The 450ppm scenario describes necessary emission pathways in order to avoid global temperature rises beyond 2°C.

As many worldwide acting companies, Daimler will most probably be faced with some sort of the 450ppm scenario, whereas company-specific threats and challenges have not yet been examined. Therefore, Daimler Trucks will be shortly illustrated in terms of how GHG emissions are handled. The bridge between theoretical background (part three) and empirical part of this thesis (Part four) is the application of the comparison between BAU and 450ppm to the real case of Daimler Trucks in the light of the following research question:  How far does the current internal logistics of Daimler Trucks comply with possible market conditions and policy regulations of a 2°C target scenario?

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oikos International

posted July 27, 2016

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Economic Evaluation of the Environmental Impact of Shipping from the Perspective of CO2 Emissions

In this research we evaluate the environmental economic impact of shipping from the perspective of CO2 emissions by implementing Marine Emission Trading Scheme (METS), as defined. This trading scheme is based on the EU Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS) program with adjustments for the shipping industry’s needs.
First, we evaluate the socio-economic cost of carbon emissions from seaborne trade activity per borne ton and per consumed ton fuel in both Business as Usual (BAU) and METS state. Then we continue to evaluate the relative socio-economic effect with regional segmentation, transportation mode, and the expected effect on the shipping industry from both the economic and environmental perspective.

The METS economic model is calibrated with the Fuel Consumption data (FC), forecasted FC growth rate (based on the proportion between FC growth rate and global trade growth rate), forecasted emission abatement rate (based on EU-ETS actual performance) and Emission Unit Allowance (EUA) prices. This generates an economic evaluation based on multiple CO2 emission scenarios, allowing us to estimate the socio-economic impact on the environment from seaborne trade activity per borne ton criteria and per consumed ton fuel criteria in BAU State and METS State.

The research shows that METS is effective, for an annual reduction rate of 7% or more, but its efficiency is dependent upon the low growth rate of fuel demand.
International shipping, in a state of BAU, is expected to increase its economic environmental influence by 356% from 2007 to 2030, with the maximum increase of CO2 emissions estimated at 324%. In contrast, implementation of METS is expected to decrease CO2 emissions between 54% and 93% with the maximum emission growth rate at 207%, and the minimum emission growth rate at 110%. In relation to the BAU state and the external costs per ton of fuel consumed under BAU is expected to grow by 16%, although with the expected rise in fuel prices this rate could decrease to 5%.
We found that under METS regulation this rate would grow only by up to 10% and decrease up to 4%. In addition, we found that calculations of external cost per transported ton are likely to create an imbalance between payments and actual contribution to the pollution problem.
To conclude, the current sea freight tariff system does not account for the external costs of CO2 emissions, and therefore we suggest that International Maritime Organization (IMO), must take charge, lead and coordinate an international program of emission trade, that could achieve effective reductions with minimum impact on business activity

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oikos International

posted July 26, 2016

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Alibaba.com between Economic Success and Corporate Responsibility

Abstract

The Alibaba Group was one of the biggest and fastest growing businesses in China for about ten years. Among many other companies under the holding’s umbrella, Alibaba.com had become the world’s most frequented market place in the Business to Business segment. The company provided an internet platform for especially small and medium sized companies, where western demands meet Asian supply.

Although the platform opened the door for many firms to the international markets, there was room for improvement. Due to the increasing access to information through the World Wide Web, customers had become more and more sensitive to what is known as corporate responsibility. Sustainable business models and fair working conditions were more than ever of huge importance for the customer. In order to respond to this trend, companies on the demand side had to make sure that their suppliers fulfill not only European standards.

This trend of corporate responsibility recently caused many complaints about the listing and transparency of the Alibaba platform. On the supply side, suppliers missed a tool for signaling their working and quality standards to their customers. There was hardly a way to differentiate from competitors on the webpage. On the demand side companies suffered the same problem vice versa. There was barely a way for small western companies to control and check quality and labor issues for their supply chain without long lasting selection and arrangement processes.

But not only direct users of Alibaba.com drew the attention to the Alibaba system. Years ago many NGOs (Non-Governmental Organizations) claimed for more transparency and social standards on the Alibaba.com homepage.

Jack Ma, the CEO of Alibaba, knew about these problems. However, he also knew that many firms that once started with poor standards were nowadays great companies with well-known products all over the world. With a higher entry barrier, these corporations would not have had the chance to enter the market at all. Developing from a small company with low standards to a firm with high standards was often a long and time-consuming process.

Triggered by the recent complaints Ma was challenged by several self-imposed questions. Ma knew that the listing and policy on his platform were deeply connected with those questions and that there would be no easy solution. Whatever he decided should be the best answer for all parties: The Company, the customers and society.

AuthorsKannika Leelapanyalert, David Beschorner, Kim Nadine Reckmann and Marie Aslanian
InstitutionCollege of Management, Mahidol University, Thailand
Competition Year2016
PlaceRunner up
TrackCorporate Sustainability
Key WordsAlibaba, corporate sustainability, supplier, NGO, B2B
CoursesInternational marketing
Target AudienceMBAs
Permission rightsThis case is part of the oikos free case collection. Download a free online copy below. If you are a faculty member and you are interested in teaching this case, you can request a free teaching note by sending us an email to freecase@oikos-international.org.
DownloadFree Case

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oikos International

posted June 27, 2016

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Cocoa Sourcing – Sustainability Challenges and Emerging Corporate Response

The chocolate industry is confronted with serious sustainability challenges in cocoa production that may put long term cocoa supply at risk. Although sustainability challenges have been a concern for the industry for some years, the challenges have become more complex and increasingly urgent. Hence, it is analysed how chocolate manufacturers started to address the challenges. Additionally, the influence of these emerging corporate responses on global cocoa sourcing and on the sustainability challenges is assessed. The comprehensive review of the emerging corporate responses of six Switzerland-based companies shows that the responses represent similar approaches towards sustainable cocoa sourcing. The assessment of the influence on global cocoa sourcing reveals major effects on the cocoa procurement market. About the effect of the emerging corporate responses on the sustainability challenges in cocoa production no conclusive statement can be made because of the incomplete data basis. Overall, the chocolate companies see themselves as being in transition to sustainable cocoa sourcing.

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oikos International

posted June 18, 2016

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Business and Human Rights in the Post-Westphalian Era: A Democracy-Based Assessment

The modern concept of human rights and its accompanying international legal regime were developed under the umbrella of the Westphalia international governance framework. Globalization, though, puts into question some of the fundamental pillars of Westphalia, particularly its state centric premise. As the regulatory power of the state declines, corporations, in conjunction with other non-state agents, engage in the provision of public goods and participate in the regulation of the vacuums left behind by waning states. Globalization forces us to re-think, not only the way governance is exercised at the international political arena but, more crucially to this project, how and who should assume the responsibilities derived from human rights in a context where the state is not the exclusive actor anymore.

Scholars in the business and human rights debate (BHR) have discussed extensively about why should corporations assume these responsibilities, and what should be their ideal scope. Today, the assumption that corporations do have human rights responsibilities is almost undisputed. Yet, how should corporations discharge these responsibilities? The BHR field has remained relatively silent on this question. As the debate expands, this question becomes highly topical to address. This is the central research question of this dissertation.

The main BHR responsibilities accounts have tended to adopt a commoditized conception of human rights. As a consequence, the guidance they offer on the question of how to realize the corporate human rights responsibilities is limited. Typically, human rights victims are presented as passive agents in the realization of their rights, while the responsibilities of corporations are conceived to start and end with the provision of certain goods, capabilities or resources. A democracy perspective on the BHR debate will reveal that such materialistic approach to the realization of human rights responsibilities strengthens, rather than weakens, potential patterns of injustice and domination. Human rights are not exhausted by the provision of certain goods. They also have a political dimension that must be realized. Such dimension entails that we all have the right to demand and provide justification for all those institutions that bind us. This is what the philosopher Rainer Forst labels as the basic right to justification.

Any just and complete realization of human rights inexorably requires realizing this basic right. Thus, this dissertation defends the thesis that when corporations are identified as human rights duty bearers they should discharge their responsibilities guaranteeing, in the first place, the right to justification. The best way to comply with this provision, I argue, is for corporations to create institutions or initiatives that facilitate or grant the right to justification to the victims of human rights abuses. These institutions, I claim, should be constructed around four premises: they should be victim-centered, able to adapt to different political and social contexts, oriented towards solving the injustices that led to the human rights violations, and functioning along the parameters of deliberative democracy.

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oikos International

posted June 10, 2016

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