Awakening Conscious Leadership 101

Three oikos LEAP Alumni want to share an opportunity to learn a science-based approach to navigate stress and complexity more skillfully. Lis McNicholl , Louise O’Rourke, and Benoit Pitsaer have been working to offer the Awakening Conscious Leadership 101 workshop to the oikos Alumni community. The workshop is based on the work by Daniel Friedland, MD from SuperSmartHealth in partnership with Jon Berghoff from XCHANGE.

There are two opportunities to join this FREE workshop: Nov 10, 7 – 9 pm CET & Dec 6, 7 – 9 pm CET Here’s the Registration page to view the description of the workshop and to register.

We hope you can join us! Feel free to contact us if you have any questions : benoit.pitsaer@oikos-international.org Wishing you all the best, Lis, Louise and Benoit

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oikos International

posted December 6, 2021

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LEAP Advanced Info Calls

Are you ready to become a more conscious leader? Embark on a 10 month self-discovery journey with like-minded adventurers and learn how to transform yourself and your environment to become the change agent this world needs.

The next LEAP Advanced cohort starts already in February 22 and applications open on December 1st! We are hosting two Info Calls for everyone interested to hear about the upcoming cohort and to answer all of your questions on December 1st, 4-5:30pm CET and on January 10th, 7-8:30pm CET, so make sure to join us for the Info Call.

You can join the calls by registering here.

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oikos International

posted November 26, 2021

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Call for papers: Responsible Leadership Reimagined Conference

16 – 18 March 2022 | Lanzerac, Stellenbosch, South Africa

WHAT IS RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP?

Responsible leadership is a leadership approach that addresses responsibilities and accountabilities of business leaders. It is driven by purpose and positive social impact. To reach a complete understanding of responsible leadership, its importance and how it can be implemented to benefit society, we need to establish a number of things. These include:

How do we make sense of the concept of responsible leadership globally as well as in the African context?
What are the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for the responsible leadership discourse?
What is the relationship between responsible leadership and social innovation?
How can organisations develop and nurture responsible leaders internally?
How can we establish a dialogue between sectors, co-create best practices and shape pathways and actions towards responsible leadership?

WHY WE NEED THIS CONFERENCE

The Responsible Leadership Reimagined Conference is an event that seeks to address important questions about responsible leadership, and encourage further research and to advance the discussion on responsible leadership in Africa. This will enable us to move towards a common understanding of what responsible leadership is and what it can achieve on the continent.

HOW YOU CAN HELP US

Send us your papers and contributions that theoretically and empirically assess responsible leadership and its relation to individual ethical decision-making, best responsible business practice (in for-profit, non-profit, hybrid, international organisations and government), stakeholder engagement, community partnerships, and cross-sector collaboration. With your help, we can increase our understanding of responsible leaders and implement the correct policies in order to achieve widespread, meaningful and positive social impact in greater society and in organisations around the world.

SUBMISSION DEADLINES

Scholarly paper abstract submissions: 30 November 2021

Practitioner presentation submissions: 30 November 2021

Notification of review results of abstract/presentation submissions: 15 December 2021

Final paper submissions: 31 January 2022

Email address for submissions: RLRConference@usb.ac.za

Learn more and submit your paper: https://www.usb.ac.za/usb_events/responsible-leadership-reimagined-conference/

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GRLI - Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative

posted November 12, 2021

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Awakening Conscious Leadership 101

Three oikos LEAP Alumni want to share an opportunity to learn a science-based approach to navigate stress and complexity more skillfully. Lis McNicholl , Louise O’Rourke, and Benoit Pitsaer have been working to offer the Awakening Conscious Leadership 101 workshop to the oikos Alumni community. The workshop is based on the work by Daniel Friedland, MD from SuperSmartHealth in partnership with Jon Berghoff from XCHANGE.

There are two opportunities to join this FREE workshop: Nov 10, 7 – 9 pm CET & Dec 6, 7 – 9 pm CET Here’s the Registration page to view the description of the workshop and to register.

We hope you can join us! Feel free to contact us if you have any questions : benoit.pitsaer@oikos-international.org Wishing you all the best, Lis, Louise and Benoit

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oikos International

posted November 10, 2021

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Awakening Conscious Leadership 101

Three oikos LEAP Alumni want to share an opportunity to learn a science-based approach to navigate stress and complexity more skillfully. Lis McNicholl , Louise O’Rourke, and Benoit Pitsaer have been working to offer the Awakening Conscious Leadership 101 workshop to the oikos Alumni community. The workshop is based on the work by Daniel Friedland, MD from SuperSmartHealth in partnership with Jon Berghoff from XCHANGE.

There are two opportunities to join this FREE workshop: Nov 10, 7 – 9 pm CET & Dec 6, 7 – 9 pm CET Here’s the Registration page to view the description of the workshop and to register.

We hope you can join us! Feel free to contact us if you have any questions : benoit.pitsaer@oikos-international.org Wishing you all the best, Lis, Louise and Benoit

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oikos International

posted November 3, 2021

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Open LEAP Webinar | Competences for a Responsible Leader

What are the Competencies for Responsible Leaders? Mark Wade, a renowned expert in sustainability will be talking about this topic in a very interactive session.

To get the most out of the webinar, think about the questions below:

  • A leader that has inspired you. They can be people from history, current times, public figures or from your private life.
  • What made them inspiring to you? What values,  behaviours and qualities did they embody that made them so inspiring?

Come prepared to share your thoughts!

You will also have the opportunity to get to learn more about oikos LEAP and how to get involved in the LEAP Program 2019/20. This session is open to our entire community.

Mark Wade is a renowned expert in sustainability and sought after advisor and facilitator of senior executive teams and multi-stakeholder events. Mark has a passion for developing current and future leaders with the values, mindset and capacity necessary for achieving a sustainable world.

Register here:

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About LEAP:

oikos LEAP is designed to inspire young leaders to become more responsible in their decision making and equip them with insights, knowledge and tools to do so.

oikos LEAP challenges participants to reflect on themselves and their values. Whilst adopting and sharing the lessons learnt in their chapters, participants practice sustainable leadership. The result is strengthened chapter performance and greater impact in line with the oikos mission. These basics will, moreover, accompany participants throughout their lives and result in change towards sustainability.

To summarize this purpose, we chose to name this program LEAP, in order to collectively and eagerly leap forward to a world of more sustainable leadership.

More info here: https://oikos-international.org/programmes/leap/

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oikos International

posted April 24, 2019

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Preserve: Growing a Sustainable Consumer Goods Company

Abstract

This case presents the startup and growth of Preserve, a sustainability-driven business and B Corp, in the circular economy. The company has grown over the years as a housewares and personal care consumer goods company in the retail industry with a closed loop business model on #5 plastics. With this operational model, Preserve managed to create social and commercial value by attaining strategic growth while meeting its social mission. To serve dual-purpose (social and commercial), Preserve helped its partners achieve sustainability goals, but these investments did not necessarily add to the financial bottom line and short-term growth of the company. The case focuses on the meaning of “growth” as the strategic intent for a sustainability-driven business. It explores to what extent a purpose-driven business like Preserve could meet the challenge of simultaneously being a social value leading business and keeping financial sustainability with the current business model.

The case examines Preserve’s founding mission and organizational values, and it discusses the tradeoff between social mission and economic goals any growth-driven sustainable company would face. It puts into perspective the importance of stakeholder collaboration and communication for sustainability and growth. The case introduces the framework of SEERS – Social, Environmental, Economic Responsibility and Sustainability – for evaluating Preserve’s sustainability strategy. The SEERS framework contains four elements: (1) identifying purpose and strategic intent, (2) engaging stakeholders, (3) developing metrics, and (4) implementing cascading innovations. It provides opportunities for considering strategic decision-making with respect to economic and social value generation and social responsibility.

AuthorsSinan Erzurumlu
InstitutionBabson College, USA
Competition Year2018
PlaceSecond Prize
TrackSocial Entrepreneurship
Key WordsSustainability, circular economy, closed loop, recycling, social and commercial value, blended value, Benefit corporation, B corporation, SEERS, corporate responsibility, start-up, entrepreneurship, operations management, household products, leadership, strategy
CoursesCorporate Strategy, Leadership and Strategic Management, Social Entrepreneurship, Social Innovations, Operations Management, Organizational Behavior, Sustainability, Business and the Environment, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Target AudienceMBAs, Undergrads, Executive Education
Permission rightsThis case will be published at the Case Centre shortly. You find an inspection copy for download below.
DownloadInspection Copy

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oikos International

posted June 5, 2018

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Addressing sustainability and inequality at a global level : how other worlds (may) emerge

Increased global interconnectivity has encouraged a prevalence of forums that seek to organise and facilitate action on sustainability and inequality on a global scale. A body of work has examined such global forums and the theoretical contexts in which they operate but there is little which examines the nature of engagement through these forums to address issues of sustainability and inequality. This thesis explores social actors’ participation in two global forums, the World Economic Forum (WEF) and the World Social Forum (WSF), with the aim of creating more sustainable and equal worlds. It has been structured around four overarching research questions as follows. RQ1. What are the perceived relationships between dominant and dominated social actors in global sustainability debates? RQ2. How do different social actors perceive the global field as embodied by the two world forums? RQ3. How do different social actors perceive the struggle in the field, and the strategies adopted? RQ4. How do different social actors perceive the lasting impact of their own participation in the field? Using Bourdieu’s social theory, I propose that the research settings of WEF and WSF are enactments and representations of a global field of power (RQ1). In this global field of power, social actors use global capital, a form of symbolic capital, to define the doxa of the field, that is, the taken-for-granted assumptions about issues of sustainability and inequality that require response, how they are defined and how they should be resolved (RQ2). I discuss the tensions and dilemmas of social actors as they enact strategies within the field to promote conservation, succession and/or subversion of the doxa in relation to these issues of sustainability and inequality (RQ3). The nature and extent of shifts in the global field of power as perceived by social actors is shown, with the aim that such shifts will support the creation of other more sustainable and equal worlds (RQ4). The empirical material gives participant impressions of their own involvement, which has implications for the identities, roles and activities of global social actors.

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oikos International

posted March 21, 2017

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oikos LEAP Webinar “Thinking Innovation For Better Projects”

As part of the oikos LEAP Leadership Program, three inspirational Webinars are open to all oikos members.

We’re kicking of the season with this special Webinar on project design, design thinking and putting a good will into an even better project, captured under the name “Thinking Innovation for Better Projects”. Webinar Leader Daniel Hires has conducted numerous projects and grown businesses in the sustainability realm. T name a few, he co-founded MakeSense, an online matching-platform for social entrepreneurs, co-authored the book “Phase 0 – How to make some action” (http://www.phase0.org/), established the Silent Climate Parade and now works with the UN environmental program to connect the landscape of green entrepreneurs in the MENA region.

We are extremely happy to have him with us. Appreciate his great work by attending our LEAP webinar and bring questions along his way! To join the webinar, find the call details in the oikos Intranet Calendar or write to adrian.jagow@oikos-international.org. Time is 6pm (18:00) Central European Time.

Read more about Daniel Hires on his Website below.

green social business

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oikos International

posted November 23, 2016

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Business and Human Rights in the Post-Westphalian Era: A Democracy-Based Assessment

The modern concept of human rights and its accompanying international legal regime were developed under the umbrella of the Westphalia international governance framework. Globalization, though, puts into question some of the fundamental pillars of Westphalia, particularly its state centric premise. As the regulatory power of the state declines, corporations, in conjunction with other non-state agents, engage in the provision of public goods and participate in the regulation of the vacuums left behind by waning states. Globalization forces us to re-think, not only the way governance is exercised at the international political arena but, more crucially to this project, how and who should assume the responsibilities derived from human rights in a context where the state is not the exclusive actor anymore.

Scholars in the business and human rights debate (BHR) have discussed extensively about why should corporations assume these responsibilities, and what should be their ideal scope. Today, the assumption that corporations do have human rights responsibilities is almost undisputed. Yet, how should corporations discharge these responsibilities? The BHR field has remained relatively silent on this question. As the debate expands, this question becomes highly topical to address. This is the central research question of this dissertation.

The main BHR responsibilities accounts have tended to adopt a commoditized conception of human rights. As a consequence, the guidance they offer on the question of how to realize the corporate human rights responsibilities is limited. Typically, human rights victims are presented as passive agents in the realization of their rights, while the responsibilities of corporations are conceived to start and end with the provision of certain goods, capabilities or resources. A democracy perspective on the BHR debate will reveal that such materialistic approach to the realization of human rights responsibilities strengthens, rather than weakens, potential patterns of injustice and domination. Human rights are not exhausted by the provision of certain goods. They also have a political dimension that must be realized. Such dimension entails that we all have the right to demand and provide justification for all those institutions that bind us. This is what the philosopher Rainer Forst labels as the basic right to justification.

Any just and complete realization of human rights inexorably requires realizing this basic right. Thus, this dissertation defends the thesis that when corporations are identified as human rights duty bearers they should discharge their responsibilities guaranteeing, in the first place, the right to justification. The best way to comply with this provision, I argue, is for corporations to create institutions or initiatives that facilitate or grant the right to justification to the victims of human rights abuses. These institutions, I claim, should be constructed around four premises: they should be victim-centered, able to adapt to different political and social contexts, oriented towards solving the injustices that led to the human rights violations, and functioning along the parameters of deliberative democracy.

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oikos International

posted June 10, 2016

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